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Month / September 2015

Do you want their eyeballs or emotions?

An exciting opportunity for brand design.

Once upon a time, and not really so long ago, marketing communication worked by interruption. It might have been of the tv programme people were watching; or of their journey to work; or of their fairly limited choice of provided media. But now there’s been a paradigm shift in how we interact with communication – because today the audience ‘owns’ the media marketing channels. It’s a sobering thought that the ten years or so added to our lifespan since the 1950s are spent looking at a screen.

The watchword today is engagement not impact, and I think that the sad effect of that has been to value quantity at minimal costs over crafted quality and genuinely persuasive creativity. This is not to argue that banner advertising and judiciously-placed Facebook posts have no effect but often it feels like it’s our eyeballs rather than our emotions that are being sought. Where are the new major brands being created in a world of swamping communications?

I would suggest that this is where the power of design is becoming of greater importance to brands. It may be the one relatively permanent element of a brand’s communication…

That’s both a heavy responsibility and an exciting opportunity for designers.

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Scott Sherrard
Brand Strategy Consultant, 
StudioLR

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Disruptive Design – International conference on inclusive design

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Lucy’s attending an Royal College of Art today, at an International conference on inclusive design.

The conference theme is Disruptive Ideas in Inclusive Design.

Keynote speakers from Denmark, Finland, Hong Kong and Switzerland will address the conference.

Since the international inclusive design community first came together around the needs of older and disabled people for the inaugural Include conference in 2001, a series of disruptions have moved the tectonic plates under the field.

Definitions of inclusive design have expanded, new directions have proliferated and the rapid emergence of new technologies has altered the landscape too.

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